Mitochondrial Disease Autism Spectrum Disorder Study

mitoautism

When I heard about this study (listed below) a few weeks ago, I was so grateful that a group of practitioners were continuing to further explore what a small group of parents and I have been exploring for the past years with our children that there may be a larger connection between oxidative stress, biomarkers for methylation and our children’s clinical health, than others have once believed.

A little bit of background,  In the past few years, there have been a number of papers which have shown small groups of autistic children have mitochondrial disease and dysfunction (More here, here, and here). As well as a number of studies looking at biomarkers for oxidative stress in children with autism (read more here, here and here). This study will look at subgroups of these populations and attempt to quantify, compare and contrast those oxidative stress biomarkers in a larger group of children than has previously been studied.

Please take a moment to share this study with someone… a friend who has an autistic child, a speech or occupational therapist who may have contact with a number of autistic children daily, or a pediatrician or other medical practitioner who may have quite a few patients who may qualify for this study.   This is not a treatment study and will require: “collection of a blood sample and an evaluation of behavior, development and language (unless your child is typically developing).” However, it will gain the much-needed data to further investigate the connection between mitochondrial disease and autism as well as move a step closer to earlier screening and intervention through bio-markers measured through blood.

_______________________________________________________________

Study Title:

Defining subgroups of mitochondrial disease and dysfunction in autism spectrum disorder

Study Description:

Researchers at Arkansas Children’s Hospital Research Institute are conducting a study examining mitochondrial function in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. The study will address how mitochondrial dysfunction is related to abnormalities in oxidative stress and how it is related to development and behavior. The study will assess mitochondrial function in several groups of children ages 3-14 years of age, including those with autism spectrum disorder, mitochondrial disease, developmental delays as well as those that are typically developing. The study consists of collection of a blood sample and an evaluation of behavior, development and language (unless your child is typically developing).

Study Eligibility:

We are recruiting children between the ages of 3-14 years who fall into one of the following groups:
1. Typically developing
2. Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder using gold-standard criteria
3. Diagnosed with Mitochondrial Disease
4. Diagnosed with both Autism Spectrum Disorder and Mitochondrial Disease
5. Diagnosed with Developmental Delay without Autism or Mitochondrial Disease.

Contact Name and Number:

Please contact the study coordinator,

John Slattery, at 501-364-3556

jcslattery@uams.edu

Defining subgroups of mitochondrial disease and dysfunction in autism spectrum disorder
http://www.arkansasautismalliance.org/research

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This entry was posted in Advocacy, Autism, Medical, Methylation, Mitochondrial Disease and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Mitochondrial Disease Autism Spectrum Disorder Study

  1. Pingback: Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Autism ~ New Research | Taking Baby{food}Steps…

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